Sunday, May 22, 2011

True Grit



I saw the new film of True grit on the plane over and read the book when I got here. the book is a wee gem of the genre. I liked this line in it:

"On his deathbed he asked for a priest and became a Catholic. That was his wife's religion. It was his own business and none of mine. If you had sentenced one hundred and sixty men to death and seen around eighty of them swing, then maybe at the last minute you would feel the need for some stronger medicine than the Methodists could make."

— Charles Portis (True Grit)

6 Comments:

Blogger david said...

Is the film as good as the John Wayne original?

12:18 PM  
Blogger Paulinus said...

I think it's better. Even Matt Damon outs in a decent shift as LeBeouf.

6:20 PM  
Blogger david said...

My kids like the original. Is the new one suitable for 10-12yr olds? I noted a previous blog regarding your father and LRDG. I am researching the episode on Ist. Your father wasn't Archie per chance?

8:18 PM  
Blogger Paulinus said...

Hmmmm. The hanging scene might be a bit too much for youngsters. Pretty graphic.

My Dad's nickname in the LRDG was Mick if that's any help and was in the unti from 1943-when the unit was disbanded (Aug 1945?) His best mate was a guy called Kip.

6:45 PM  
Blogger david said...

Thanks for that - I won't rush out and get the DVD just yet.

As a curator and archivist I would like to follow the LRDG thing up off line if I can. I have been trying to work out if there is a way that two people with google accounts can communicate directly but I don't if this is possible (I'm new to this sort of thing!). Any ideas?

Anyway enjoying your blog.

7:27 PM  
Blogger Paulinus said...

David

If you want to email me I have some pointers. lepanto{at}hotmail{dot}co{dot}uk

The LRDG archive is, I believe at the Imperial War Museum. The LRDG association had a newsletter which Jim Patch, the editor, bequeathed to the IWM.Other stuff - reminiscences, anecdotes etc can also be found in Mars and Minerva, the journal of the SAS association, but they are like gold dust and guarded with great care, as you can imagine.

The SAS association took the LRDG association under its wing when the members of the LRDGA became too few/old to run their own affairs.

12:09 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home