Tuesday, June 09, 2009

My liturgical Ignorance #1



Eastertide ends with Pentecost but the Regina Coeli is sung at the end of compline until Trinity Sunday.

Why?

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10 Comments:

Blogger Patricius said...

Because until the 1970 reform of the calendar Eastertide continued through the octave of Pentecost. Indeed we used to be toid that we had until Trinity Sunday to make our Easter duties. Funnily enough the reformers didn't get their hands on the Marian antiphons!

8:10 AM  
Blogger Pelicanus said...

Well...

Eastertide really finished on Ascension day - which is why the candle was extinguished after our Lord's Ascension is described in the scriptures of the main Mass. Then there was Ascensiontide and then the Octave of Pentecost.

So it's really a "three season" antiphon. Similarly, the Alma Redemptorist Mater does Advent, Christmastide and Epiphanytide. Ave Regina Caelorum does Septuagesima and Lent - which includes Passiontide.

10:29 AM  
Blogger Patricius said...

Pelicanus-
You are correct in so far as the extinguishing of the Paschal candle took place after the Gospel on Ascension Day, however, Eastertide continued until the Saturday preceding Trinity Sunday as was evident in the additional alleluias and the singing of the Vidi Aquam before high mass on Sunday up until Whit Sunday, the Asperges being resumed for the first time since Passion Sunday on Trinity Sunday.
The Ave Regina Caelorum was taken up from Compline of 2nd February whether or not Septuagesima had started.

Liturgists in those days discussed the temporal calendar in terms of two cycles, that of Easter and that of Christmas- being related to the mysteries of the Redemption and the Incarnation respectively. The modern(1970) calendar is more Redemption-focussed which is why feasts like the Presentation and the Annunciation with their Incarnational and Marian bias are relatively down played. The lead for this appears to have come from Sacrosanctum Concilium in which much is made of Sunday and the celebration of the Resurrection as the primary feast.

2:02 PM  
Blogger Mac McLernon said...

Funnily enough the reformers didn't get their hands on the Marian antiphons!

That's because they had sidelined Our Lady to such an extent that the Marian anthem was only recited after Compline, and not after Mass or Benediction...

2:32 PM  
Blogger Paulinus said...

That's because they had sidelined Our Lady to such an extent that the Marian anthem was only recited after Compline, and not after Mass or Benediction...

The liturgy in the parish is OF but when we sing Holy Mass with plainchant the schola sticks in a Marian antiphon at the end. If the Liturgy Cops come for us we'll plead liturgical diversity as a defence.

3:09 PM  
Blogger carl said...

Pelicanus--
To expand upon a comment of Patricius: in the 1962 rubrics the Regina Caeli is sung during "Paschaltide", which is composed of the Easter season, Ascensiontide, and the octave of Pentecost.

5:36 PM  
Blogger Pelicanus said...

Patricius:
I think my point that the seasons within the calendar are more nuanced than you suggest and that there is overlap still remains.

Your comment about the potential overlap of the time between Epiphany and Candlemas and the time between Septuagesima and Lent seems to highlight that.

Indeed, in that situation we would have the Marian antiphon governed by one season while the majority of the liturgical practice is governed by another.

So I don't think you can base your position on the retention of the Vidi Aquam and a few Alleluias.

I think Carl is right to emphasise that the liturgy has lots of layers.

10:46 PM  
Blogger Patricius said...

Pelicanus:
My remarks regarding the additional alleluias, the Vidi Aquam and so on are not the "basis of a position". Like the reference to the time for making Easter duties in my first comment they were simply meant as illustrations of the longer extent of Eastertide under the old calendar. As Carl points out, Eastertide included Ascensiontide and the octave of Pentecost.
The rubrics regarding the Marian Antiphons (sometimes called anthems because they are not, strictly speaking, antiphons) may be found in the 1956 edition of the "Liber Usualis" and in "Plainsong for Schools" Volume 1 of the same date. Interestingly, the antiphons are printed in the current (English) Divine Office but without any indication as to when they should be sung. It is therefore unsurprising that some people, continue to follow the old rubric- in the absence of any clear directive to the contrary.

Interestingly, the Regina Caeli has another role apart from post Vespers and post Compline and that is in place of the Angelus during Eastertide. Most prayerbooks state that explicitly. Following that logic it would make sense for the majority of us who use the modern calendar to change to the Salve Regina after Vespers on Whitsunday.

2:02 AM  
Blogger carl said...

Patricius said, "It is therefore unsurprising that some people, continue to follow the old rubric- in the absence of any clear directive to the contrary."

This is an interesting point. Initially, I said the Salve Regina after Candlemas and until Lent. Then after SP and discussing it with a seminarian, I decided to switch to the traditional dates for the antiphon in the case of Salve vs. Ave Regina Caelorum. A priest with whom I had dinner once hadn't thought of this, and after some discussion, he was convinced that it was best to use the traditional scheme.

Switching on 2 Feb. from the Alma Redemptoris Mater even in the OF makes sense because in both the OF and EF you're in the midst of tempus per annum; thus, the situation hasn't really changed between the forms.

In the case of the Regina Caeli, I think the dates of switching to the Salve should be different between the forms. There is an intrinsic connection between the Regina Caeli and the Easter season. It is clear in the EF rubrics, and explicit for the OF (GILH 92). Were I to say Compline in the OF during the week after Pentecost, I would use the Salve, because it is no longer Easter; it doesn't make sense to use the Easter antiphon during ordinary time.

9:37 PM  
Anonymous Hestor said...

If you're glad the reformers didn't get their hands on the antiphons just look at what they tried to do to the rosary

12:50 PM  

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