Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Can anyone answer this question?

Given that St Thomas Aquinas was canonised in 1323 - were any pre-Reformation English parish churches ever dedicated to the Angelic Doctor? Were any dedicated to St Francis of Assisi given that he was canonised in 1228?

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6 Comments:

Blogger Mrs Jackie Parkes MJ said...

Good question! Have no idea...

6:01 PM  
Blogger Philip said...

As Fr. Benedict Groeschel says about every question on his TV show... "That's a very good question!"

God bless him...

... and no, I've not come across a pre-reformation English church dedicated to either saint - nor also S Catherine of Siena.

10:24 PM  
Blogger Fr PF said...

In the 'Oxford Dictionary of Saints', David Hugh Farmer says that in England there are 'two ancient churches and many modern ones' dedicated to Saint Francis; unfortunately, he doesn't say where they are, nor does he mention any churches dedicated to Saint Thomas Aquinas.

11:45 PM  
Blogger Fr Ray Blake said...

I suspect that there were few new parishes created between the Norman Conquest and the Reformation, parishes were territorial, after all. Therefore Churches and chapels dedicated to saints from the newer religious orders were likely to be on there own property, and not parish Churches. These were generally swept away as being unnecessary after the Reformation.

9:01 AM  
Blogger Paulinus said...

Thank you, Fathers, for that.

Philip I hadn't even thought of St Catherine. There is a street in Edinburgh called Scienes Place (named, i think after a pre-reformation Dominican convent (Scienes=Siena) Greyfriars Bobby, an all that, too. And Blackfriars Bridge in london and Blackfriars St in Edinburgh....

3:39 PM  
Anonymous boeciana said...

Yes, few new parishes generally on this island after 1200 or so. (To generalise wildly.) I don't think I've come across any Thomas Aquinas dedications in medieval Scotland, FWIW.

Paulinus, you're quite right about Sciennes. (The Greyfriars of Edinburgh were the Observants, who got here about 1460. The Blackfriars had been here since the C13. Incidentally.)

4:17 PM  

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